The Post-modern Interpretation of Decoherence

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There is a very interesting concept in quantum mechanics referred to as decoherence. Decoherence is a situation that occurs when a quantum system loses its information to the environment. Let me briefly explain this.

Firstly, let me state that the modern interpretation of decoherence is that based on modern quantum mechanics, while the post-modern interpretation of decoherence is that based on post-modern quantum mechanics.

Now, it has been discovered that the atomic world behaves differently from the world of classical physics. In the atomic world, particles can behave like waves and can thus interfere with each other to produce interference patterns.

Thus, particles are said to cohere when they produce this interference patterns which is contrary to how particles behave in the outside world. So, coherence is the preservation of the quantum properties of the atomic world.

However, under certain conditions, these particles no longer interfere or behave like waves and are now said to decohere. So, decoherence refers to the loss of the quantum properties of the atomic world, as the “quantum superpositions disappear.”

When decoherence occurs, atomic particles now behave like non-atomic particles that satisfy classical laws. “Thus the quantum to classical boundary is also the boundary between coherence and lack of coherence for particles.”

Decoherence has been a relevant explanation of quantum collapse according to modern quantum mechanics and it is a much-studied phenomenon in modern quantum computing research.

One unique thing about decoherence according to modern quantum mechanics is that it is quantitatively based on the proportion or size of matter. And because of this, it is usually assumed that the smaller (and more isolated) the particle, the less likely we are to have the loss of quantum information.

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This description of decoherence, even though it recognizes the differences in the behaviour of the quantum and classical worlds, amplifies the importance of the differences in size between the particles of the quantum world and those of the classical or outside world.

This quantitative description of decoherence is supported by the fact that in 1996, Serge Haroche and his co-workers at École Normale Supérieure in Paris attempted to quantitatively measure the process of a “quantum superposition gradually obliterated by decoherence.” — Wikipedia

In their practical investigation, Serge Haroche and his co-workers attempted to quantitatively measure decoherence by studying how it is influenced by the environment which in the case of this experiment was a “microwave filled cavity.”

Thus, in modern quantum mechanics, we only have a quantitative understanding of decoherence. We understand that as we increase the size of particles “towards that of the macroscopic world, quantum superpositions disappear.” This is what decoherence means in modern quantum mechanics.

Now, in post-modern quantum mechanics, we have a qualitative understanding of decoherence. In post-modern quantum mechanics, the study of decoherence is qualitatively based on the absolute principles of motion.

This is very important because it exposes the conceptual flaws in modern quantum mechanics. The quantitative study of decoherence in modern quantum mechanics follows from the fact that modern quantum mechanics implicitly espouse that quantum behaviours are due to the different sizes of microscopic and macroscopic bodies.

In post-modern quantum mechanics, decoherence is qualitatively based on the absolute principles of motion.Click To Tweet

This sole quantitative study of decoherence is supported by the fact that there is no fundamental principle in modern quantum mechanics. Quantum mechanics does not inform us why the atomic world is the way it is beyond the eliciting the notion that it is because the particles we are studying are small. This is superficial as you can attest.

In post-modern quantum mechanics the term or concept “quantum” has a broader, or will I say, a different and more illuminating meaning. When we approach the quantum world in post-modern physics, we approach it not just thinking about its small size but also about the fundamental principle that governs the quantum world which we already know.

This principle is (the strong phase of) the principle of non-inertia. The whole idea of “quantum” in post-modern physics creates the new notion of a world governed by the strong phase of the principle of non-inertia (and not just a world of microscopic particles.) I will discuss why this is important in this article.

Post-modern quantum mechanics is not as vague as modern quantum mechanics. The quantitative description of decoherence in modern quantum mechanics results in a quantitative description of quantum collapse.

However, I want you to know that in post-modern quantum mechanics, quantum collapse takes a qualitative description based on the different absolute principles that govern the atomic and non-atomic worlds.

This is very different from modern quantum mechanics which describes quantum collapse based solely on the different sizes of the atomic and non-atomic bodies. The article below is very related to this article, and I will like you to read it.

In modern quantum mechanics, the environment is perceived to influence the atomic world because of its different size from the atomic particles or quantum system we may wish to isolate. The is one of the wrong, underlying assumptions in physics.

The qualitative description of decoherence based on the qualitative difference between the atomic world and the non-atomic world establishes decoherence as a very natural phenomenon than we couldn’t have realized from its quantitative description.

The atomic world or quantum system is governed by the strong phase of the principle of non-inertia, while the non-atomic world or the environment is governed by the weak phase of the principle of non-inertia, and it is upon this qualitative distinction based on absolute principles that the description of decoherence according to post-modern quantum mechanics is realized.

This new description of decoherence informs us that quantum superpositions do not disappear because of the quantitative interactions between a quantum system and its environment, but because of a qualitative interaction between the quantum system and the environment.

The true inherent non-homogeneity between a quantum system and the environment and that precipitates their interaction is not based on their different sizes, but is based on the different principles that govern the quantum system and the environment.

You must come to understand this shift in the interpretation of decoherence, for post-modern quantum mechanics or post-modern physics will assist us in surmounting the practical challenges that now confront quantum computing.

In the modern era of physics lies, we did not have the true understanding of the atomic world but now we do. So, there is bound to be a difference in our understanding and practical investigation of decoherence.

We never understood that when we increase the size of a quantum system to that of a macroscopic system, we are underlyingly shifting from the strong phase of the principle of non-inertia to the weak phase of the principle of non-inertia. The diagram below shows this.

The post-modern interpretation of decoherence

It is important that we now know what we are doing. The difference in principle between a microscopic particle and a macroscopic body is what is responsible for their different behaviours.

This reinforces the notion that both macro and micro objects can be under the same set of principles despite their different sizes even though they aren’t. So, in the post-modern interpretation of decoherence, we are looking at fundamental principles.

The crossing of the border of the atomic world between the classical world is a shift from the strong phase of the principle of non-inertia to the weak phase of the principle of non-inertia.

So, even the included classical world, in the post-modern interpretation, now comes with its own principle which is the weak phase of the principle of non-inertia and which is missing in the modern interpretation of decoherence.

The quantum to classical boundary is now based on the weak and the strong phases of the principle of non-inertia and not superficially on the micro and macro sizes of the quantum and classical worlds respectively.

This post-modern interpretation of decoherence cuts across most of the confronting mysteries of the atomic world. It explains based on these absolute principles the observer effect which I hope to discuss exclusively in one of my future articles.

This post-modern interpretation of decoherence is very much needed in quantum computing research. The knowledge of the strong phase of the principle of non-inertia which was before hidden is now revealed.

With this principle, we will know how to properly isolate quantum systems from the environment. I am even looking at the practical possibility of us shifting or moving the border between the weak phase and the strong phase of the principle of non-inertia. 

All these shall become possible as we explore the qualitative nature of the universe, just as we have been exploring the quantitative nature of the universe for millennia and especially for the past 400 years.

Quantum mechanics is no longer about the quanta, it is now about the (strong phase of the) principle of non-inertia. Decoherence is real and it is a natural consequence of the different absolute principles that govern the macroscopic world and the microscopic world.

Or one can say that decoherence occurs because the macroscopic world and microscopic world are governed by different phases of the principle of non-inertia. Thus, decoherence is really beyond the differences in the size of the atomic bodies and their environment.  

The strong phase of the principle of non-inertia is responsible for quantum superpositions which disappear when we move to the macroscopic domain governed by the weak phase of the principle of non-inertia. 

I really want you to really understand this article even though you would have to read some of my other articles like the one linked above to really understand decoherence and also get my e-book.

Post-modern physics proves to be indispensable and practically relevant for our scientific research into the nature of the atomic world, and this post-modern interpretation of decoherence shall serve as a very important mental tool in our exploration of the quantum world.

Until next time.

I remain your friend,

– M. V. Echa



M. V. Echa

M. V. Echa

My message is the universe, my truth is the universe, and this blog contains all you need to know about the universe, from the true nature of reality to the long-sought unity of the cosmos — which is the big picture!