Quantum Mechanics, Relativity, Geometry and the Unity of the Universe

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“Henceforth space by itself, and time by itself, are doomed to fade away into mere shadows, and only a kind of [geometrical] union of the two will preserve an independent reality.”

Hermann Minkowski

In 1907, two years after Einstein published his theory of special relativity, Hermann Minkowski who was once his teacher gave us the geometrical description of the theory of special relativity, and by this his accomplishment he showed us the central importance of space-time geometry in physics.

Now, since 1907, space-time geometry has become an essential part of modern physics and especially of relativity. It was so important that even Einstein had to give us the purely geometrical theory of general relativity in an attempt to describe gravity and extend his earlier theory of special relativity.

So, space-time geometry has become an essential part of physics and a lot of contributions have been made towards our understanding of space-time geometry by modern physicists who have been searching sincerely for the fundamental theory of the universe.

On the other hand, we also have quantum mechanics, which was birthed at almost the same time as relativity, but quantum mechanics in its inherent structure does not emphasize the space-time geometry or seek to purely describe it.

However, a unification of quantum mechanics and relativity was accomplished by Paul Dirac. So, in a way quantum electrodynamics is a quantum space-time theory.

But in this article, I want to talk separately about quantum mechanics and relativity and how the understanding of their different dispositions to space-time geometry lead to the discovery of the unity of the universe which even Dirac’s quantum electrodynamics could not achieve.

Now, since our search for the theory of the universe that will unify our understanding of physics, we sought for a theory that will unify quantum mechanics and general relativity.

And like I have said, quantum mechanics in its inherent structure does not emphasize geometry, but general relativity is all about geometry. In general relativity, space-time geometry is absolutely fundamental.

But the effort to unify these two theories proved to be very, very hard. We could not unify the purely geometrical theory of general relativity with quantum mechanics to produce, possibly, an ‘encompassing’ quantum relativistic space-time geometrical description of the universe.

This was the goal. But now, in this article, you are being informed that it was impossible in the first place. The space-time geometry of the universe could only be an attribute of relativity and not quantum mechanics or their long-sought unification.

Though both theories proved to be unfalsifiable, both theories could not together be part of the fundamental theory. One had to give way, and it was quantum mechanics.

It is easy to see why. The concern of relativity for the space-time geometry of the universe was a fundamental concern that quantum mechanics lacked. Therefore, there was no way the unity of the universe could have emerged from quantum mechanics.

Quantum mechanics was conceptually not a fundamental theory in any way. I will like to mention that Einstein was convinced about this, even though his theory of general relativity was unnoticeably flawed, he believed in the conceptual power of relativity as the only general theory that could lead to the discovery of the unity of the universe.

He felt that the unified field could be found in/by relativity. This was why on his early march towards the unified field, he did not consider quantum mechanics, until later, maybe at the end of his unfruitful pursuit.

Why am I informing you about Einstein’s disposition towards quantum mechanics which he rejected? I am informing about his disposition because it is true. Relativity as a general framework is more fundamental than quantum mechanics, and this is because of its inherent concern for the geometrical structure of the universe.

Relativity imbibes in us the much-needed concern for space-time geometry without which we cannot understand the universe at a fundamental level. It was Minkowski who set us on this path, however, it was Einstein that entrenched it beyond the possible limits when he presented the general theory of relativity.

Relativity imbibes in us the much-needed concern for space-time geometry without which we cannot understand the universe at a fundamental level.Click To Tweet

When general relativity was first presented by Einstein, it shocked the scientific community, not just because it appeared difficult but because it was a completely new way of looking at gravity.

General relativity dismisses or reduces to the mechanistic field description of gravity while also giving us a space-time field description of gravity. It was a complete deviation from classical methods. I think this is why his theory was criticised by some prominent scientists of his time.

Nevertheless, one thing I think all of them will agree, like Lord Rutherford, is that relativity is a beautiful theory, of which I agree. Just take a look at relativity and how the equations appear on paper and you will see this obvious beauty that I am talking about. Relativity is the most beautiful theory ever conceived!

Relativity is the most beautiful theory ever conceived!Click To Tweet

This beauty which is a result of the inherent geometrical nature of the theory was part of what convinced Einstein that it had to be the road to the fundamental understanding of the universe.

There is a unique formerly underlying but now revealed relationship between relativity, geometry and the unity of the universe which Einstein intuitively felt exists, even though he failed to show us how.

I am referring to Einstein in this article because he was the first to share the sentiment that I am sharing with you in this article. The only difference between mine and his is that mine is backed by the discovery of the relationship between relativity, geometry and the unity of the cosmos but his wasn’t.

In post-modern physics, we discover how the unity of the universe can emerge only from the geometrically based theory of relativity and not quantum mechanics.

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The unity of the universe is geometrical; this is why quantum mechanics is unfit to reveal to us the unity of all things, but relativity can and has done just that.

So, we now have a beautiful theory called absolute relativity which also reveals in its greater beauty the ultimate principles of creation and of the vast universe. This is the balance of eternal beauty and divine logic; this is the glory of God!

The unity of the universe is geometrical; this is why quantum mechanics is unfit to reveal to us the unity of all things, but relativity can and has done just that.Click To Tweet

Relativity is no longer a beautiful theory that couldn’t give us the encompassing theory, for it has done just that. Whether quantum mechanics is a beautiful theory, I care less, since it lacked the potential to lead to the unity of the universe no matter how twisted.

Relativity is a theory of space and time, or would I rather say, the unified union of space-time, whereas quantum mechanics is not. Any theory which advances our understanding of space and time is more fundamental than any other different theory.

Already equipped with special relativity, it was in my pure quest to understand space and time that I discovered absolute relativity. Quantum mechanics could not have assisted me in any meaningful way.

In fact, it might interest you to know that I included quantum mechanics in the earlier versions of the theory, but I later changed my mind when I saw that absolute relativity in itself could satisfactorily explain all things.

Relativity is a beautiful blend of beauty, mechanics, and geometry, unlike quantum mechanics. In this regard, there is no equal relationship between relativity and quantum mechanics; relativity is a higher theory and post-modern physics has proven this to be the case.

In post-modern physics, we come across the post-modernization of quantum mechanics, but the conceptual foundation of post-modern quantum mechanics is now absolute relativity and not quantum mechanics. This is a very important realization.

The phenomena of quantum mechanics are now being explained by absolute relativity and not quantum mechanics per se. This is why probability is no longer an inherent part of post-modern quantum mechanics.

The complementarity principle and the uncertainty principle of modern quantum mechanics have been replaced by the single and encompassing principle of non-inertia which was first derived or gotten from absolute relativity and not from quantum mechanics.

Even the mission to post-modernize quantum mechanics was a personal decision with little conceptual or theoretical motivation. Geometry, which is an inherent part of relativity, is the way to the unity of the universe.

Geometry, which is an inherent part of relativity, is the way to the unity of the universe.Click To Tweet

We must focus on geometry but not wrongly or extremely as Einstein did in general relativity. Einstein should have replicated the same theoretical procedure Minkowski applied for light in special relativity for gravity in general relativity.

In special relativity, light is a real mechanistic wave moving in a flat space-time continuum, but in general relativity, gravity is the curvature of space-time and not a real mechanistic wave unless in certain cleverly crafted approximations when it takes the Newtonian form.

Now, we are reintroducing gravity again as a mechanistic wave and this time it is reintroduced as a component of gravi-electromagnetic wave and not as an independent entity. This is how gravity finds itself into the new geometrical structure of absolute relativity.

The whole idea of gravitational waves being ripples in space-time is now abandoned and replaced by the real mechanistic gravi-electromagnetic field which is an inseparable part of the geometrical description of accelerated frames just like the electromagnetic wave is an inseparable part of the geometrical description of uniform frames.

Relativity has now become refined and re-defined to represent to the truest extent the importance and application of geometry and of the consequent geometrical unity of the universe. Quantum mechanics, being not a theory of space and time, cannot undergo this important theoretical transformation.

So, it cannot be overemphasized that geometry is central to physics; that it is the cornerstone of our understanding of the unity of the universe which can only proceed from relativity and not from quantum mechanics.

Until next time,

I will be here.

– M. V. Echa



M. V. Echa

M. V. Echa

My message is the universe, my truth is the universe, and this blog contains all you need to know about the universe, from the true nature of reality to the long-sought unity of the cosmos — which is the big picture!