Why Black Holes Are Not Far Away

“As above, so below.”

The Second Hermetic Principle

Black holes are one of the most terrifying and mystifying objects in modern physics. So the title of this article may come as a shock to you since it proposes or raises the awareness that black holes are not far away as we and many astrophysicists think.

According to modern astronomy, black holes are massive objects that can be found at the center of galaxies. Thus, considering how vast our Milky Way galaxy is and considering our position in it, we have felt safe to think that these objects are far away from us. But is the modern description of black holes really the whole picture? I will come to this in this great scientific article.

Now, modern astronomy informs us that black holes are astronomical objects with huge gravitational fields around them that can suck in any matter at close range while also crushing it due to their huge gravitational field.

This is as modern astronomy cannot say emphatically what happens to a body of matter when it falls into a black hole, going beyond what modern physicists call the event horizon“.

So, as I have said in the introductory paragraph, black holes are terrifying and mysterious objects in modern physics. However, this is partly because of how modern physics describes them.

A Black Hole

But in post-modern physics, black holes are not really terrifying or mysterious objects, and this is as we find a different description of black holes. It is then important to know that this article which seeks to inform us about why black holes are not far away follows after their post-modern description and not their modern description. 

This article which seeks to inform us about why black holes are not far away follows after their post-modern description and not their modern description.

Now, to further make you understand the fear the modern description of black holes generates. Recently, around 2015, when the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) was set to run again at a new 14 TeV energy level in order for particle physicists to test their theories and also discover new particles, this project generated a lot of fear and concern for the general public.

Most were of the opinion that the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) could create a black hole that could suck us all in, causing damages and the loss of lives or whatever.

Though CERN and some physicists came out to explain the situation and how it was impossible for that to happen, the incident had already shown how the modern description of black holes has made these objects very terrifying to the general public and even to scientists alike.

But despite all of this, post-modern physics now informs us that black holes are not far away as we think. Black holes have been around us all this while despite our terrible fear for it. Surprised? Don’t be.

Also, the post-modern view of the situation shows us how poorly we understand black hole formation. Modern physics raises the theoretical suggestion that microscopic black holes can be created from the high energy collisions of particles in our particle colliders, but this is not true.

In post-modern physics, we come to a new and profound realization of how black holes are formed in the universe and how they came to be in the first place. You can see this in The Treatise.

Our wrong understanding of black hole formation according to modern physics is the main reason why scientists like Astronomer Royal Martins Rees and others and even the general public began to speculate that particle colliders could create black holes.

It must now be clear that whatever these black holes are, that can be created in our particle colliders, they are as modern physics describes and not as post-modern physics describes them. In post-modern physics, black holes have a different meaning altogether.

Also, black hole formation by particle collisions is one of the predictions of string theory. And some scientists suggest that it could prove string theory if such a black hole is found in our particle colliders.

However, string theory informs us that such proposed microscopic black holes will not last long before they evaporate due to what is called the Hawking radiation.

So, from our discussion so far, it is evident that modern physics convinces us that black holes are distant objects that exist at the center of galaxies, but that we can in a way create these objects in our particle colliders.

This coupled with the well-touted nature of black holes to be massive objects that suck everything around them aroused our fear and concern. But are all of these right? Are black holes really far away and should we continue to be terrified and mystified by them?

To these questions, post-modern physics says NO. Black Holes are not far away and they have been with us all these while, even in our particle colliders. And concerning black hole formation, one would have to become familiar with inertial interaction as it is explained by post-modern physics.

Now, this raises the question: how are black holes not far away? The answer is very simple and it is that what we call neutrons are microscopic black holes.

What we call neutrons are microscopic black holes.Click To Tweet

Listen: in post-modern physics, both black holes and neutrons are the same kind of matter. That is, they are matter that have only inertial mass. Thus, both neutrons and black holes have the same intrinsic nature.

In post-modern physics, black holes and neutrons are bodies without rest mass. So, now, I want you to see why black holes are not far away. We have known about the neutron since 1932 when James Chadwick discovered it and we have been doing a lot of research and applications of the neutron.

But now we are coming to know that what we call neutrons and black holes are one and the same form of matter. Their only difference is that neutrons exist at the center of atoms while black holes exist at the center of galaxies, but their intrinsic nature as bodies with only inertial mass is the same. I hope you can now begin to understand why black holes are not far away.

The neutron is why black holes are not far away, for “as above, so below.” This is the revelation that demystifies black holes which are found at the center of galaxies and makes us see them in their true nature as being similar to neutrons found at the center of atoms.

The neutron is why black holes are not far away, for 'as above, so below.'Click To Tweet

That is to say, if you were to hold a neutron in your left hand and a black hole in your right hand, you would be holding or looking at the same forms of matter that only differ in size.

So, black holes, are somewhat microscopically represented by neutrons that we have been exploring in the field of nuclear research. In this sense, black holes are in a way what we have been exploring as radioactivity and nuclear energy. We just didn’t know this because we did not know very much about the origin and the nature of mass until post-modern physics.

To understand why black holes are not far away, we have to understand how the atomic world mirrors the galactic world and also how the galactic world mirrors the atomic world. This is what is referred to as the second or the correspondence principle in Hermeticism presented as a quote at the top of this great scientific post.

Thus, the second Hermetic principle sums all that have been said in this article in this manner: neutrons are why black holes are not far away, while black holes are why neutrons are not nearby. For “as above, so below.”

Neutrons are why black holes are not far away, while black holes are why neutrons are not nearby.Click To Tweet

Understand this cosmic relationship between neutrons and black holes as presented in this article and in post-modern physics, and you would have begun on your march towards experiencing the mystical unity of the universe.

Until next time,

I will be here.

– M. V. Echa



M. V. Echa

M. V. Echa

My message is the universe, my truth is the universe, and this blog contains all you need to know about the universe, from the true nature of reality to the long-sought unity of the cosmos — which is the big picture!